Lay of the land: how a garden affects property value

 


Britain isn't famous for its sunshine, so on those rare warm days it’s important to get outside and make the most of them. As we’re so fond of our gardens, they're a great place to start when improving the value of your home. Take your property up a notch by sprucing up your outdoors.


Gardens and property value


If you’re wondering how much your house is worth then your second question will almost certainly be “how can I improve it?” It turns out that paying attention to your outdoor space can pay off – a pleasant garden could add an impressive 20% to your home’s market value.


Gardens are worth especially big money in urban locations, where space is at a premium and outdoor areas are a rarity. In suburban or rural areas, more houses are likely to have gardens and so an untidy or cramped one can knock serious points off. A simple way to improve your property's value is to make your garden a selling point.


Make the most of your garden


A great first step is to make sure your garden is neat and tidy. Pull up weeds, mow the lawn and sweep away fallen leaves to smarten up the area and make it look more livable. Put away bikes and tools in a compact shed so your garden appears more spacious.


In the winter months, it’s worth laying out quality furniture to show how the space can be used in the summer. Tasteful features such as well-placed lights and colourful potted plants will brighten up the space and make it feel welcoming, even when the weather is dull. You can find some more winter garden selling tips from HouseSimple here.


Simple or stylish?


Bear in mind that some buyers can be turned off by gardens that require a lot of maintenance. Keep things simple: a large, open-plan lawn allows viewers to envisage what they’d do with the garden once they've moved in.


Having said that, keen gardeners shouldn’t feel the need to strip their gardens bare before selling. If your current plants are easy to care for, that’s a huge bonus. Adjust your pitch based on the viewers’ gardening level, or even inspire buyers to start gardening.